Pulse (July) – the monthly indicators from Impellus leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – July 2017

As one of the largest UK ILM-Approved Training Centres, Impellus provides leadership and management open courses to over 250 delegates a month. We ask for feedback from each delegate on the venue, course content and trainer’s delivery to assess our customer satisfaction level.

Our questionnaire also asks for the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. By analysing this data regularly, we have a good indication of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

Greatest fall in Management Confidence in a year

The key indicators from delegates attending our open courses in July are as follows:

  • The number of organisations training new and recently appointed managers dropped slightly year on year – 61% of all delegates had been in their role three years or less compared with 66% in July 2016
  • Interestingly, the percentage of delegates this July had been in their current role for ten years or more increased from 10% to 14%. Our recent blog illustrates the value older and longer-serving employees place on training
  • Ninety-two per cent of all delegates felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously or measurably so’ – which represents a slight decrease from 94% in July 2016

Managers are feeling the least positive about their situation at work since July 2016. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/ worse than at this time last year. Sixty per cent of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in July 2016 compared with 64% a year ago. Five per cent feel things are worse in comparison to 7% last year – so it is not that more are feeling things are worse – it’s just that less managers feel things are better and more feel things are the same as last year.

Read June Pulse to compare the results with those of July.

The Management Confidence Indicator graph below which reflects the last 12 months shows the ratings of optimism in the high 60’s and low 70’s, that we’ve seen in recent months and certainly since February this year, have taken a dip. In actual fact, the percentage of delegates feeling that things are better for them than a year ago has dropped to its lowest figure since April 2016.

Just after the referendum in July 2016, the figure was 64%. It is unknown if this fall in confidence is related to external political or economic factors, to internal stress factors like workload, or just pertinent to the organisations that were trained in July, so it will be interesting to see what happens over the next couple of months.

My Working Week by Sandra Wright

The Learning and Development Projects Manager of Impellus Ltd., an ILM-Approved Training Centre, talks through a typical week. Sandra’s role encompasses two aspects of the business – she has responsibility for delivering training two days of the week and for managing our key accounts. Sandra optimises her skills and expertise in retail, sales and marketing with blue chip organisations to bring the theory alive and engage with delegates in the training room, and to her client meetings to ensure Impellus is delivering the best service and to understand more fully our clients’ training needs.


MONDAY

My week always gets off to a lively start at our St. Albans head office. Firstly, I meet with the rest of the Training Delivery team to review the previous week’s courses and feed back to Danny, our Training
Co-ordinator, on how the venues performed. While we are all evaluating the courses, I take the opportunity, with my client development ‘hat’ on, to gather insight on client organisations to assess how I may best be able to start a conversation to ensure we are satisfying all their requirements and whether there are additional products and services that may be of interest to them.

Then I have an account management catch-up with my colleagues in the Customer Relationship and Marketing teams to review short- and long-term objectives. I update them on the meetings and conversations I had with clients the week before, we discuss opportunities that have arisen since our last meeting and plan the face-to-face meetings and telephone calls scheduled for the week ahead.

The other Learning and Development managers and I prepare for the week ahead and pack up our cars with course materials.

TUESDAY

I worked from home in the morning on final preparation for the week’s courses and a client meeting scheduled for later in the day.

Around lunchtime I set off for Maidstone where I meet with a client. We have trained two of their managers already – my contact is new to the organisation and is keen to find out more about Impellus. During our meeting, I assess the impact our courses are already having with their managers, introduce Impellus Ltd., showcase the expertise within our Training Delivery team, explain the benefits of open courses versus in-house training and highlight the advantages of the Impellus’ Business Centre (our secure client information portal), which would provide her with an overview of her whole organisation’s training activity. The client organisation has used another training provider in the past and has considerable development plans for its employees, so we discuss ways we could partner in the future.

I drive to our Maidstone venue, the Marriott Tudor Park, where I check in and ensure they are expecting us for tomorrow’s event.

Then, it’s a quick change into my jogging gear and I go for a run around the beautiful grounds which helps me to keep me focused.

WEDNESDAY

The alarm goes off at 6.00 am to ensure I’m in the training room by 7.30 am. I fine tune the room’s dynamics to Impellus’ standards and set up and test all the equipment – we like our clients to be comfortable. I also meet the Conference and Banqueting team to discuss timings, restaurant layout for lunch, fire tests and evacuation routes plus any known traffic delays that may affect the delegates.

From 8.30 am I’m in the registration area greeting the delegates, gently establishing what has motivated them to attend and trying to get a feel for their organisation’s current trading environment, as well as ensuring they have refreshments. Some of the delegates I have met before, so it is always good to renew acquaintances.

Between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm I deliver our most popular course, Leadership Skills Development, to managers across a variety of industries such as hospitality, recruitment, retail, media and publishing. During the breaks and over lunch, there are lively conversations taking place, as delegates share everyday challenges.

After the course has finished, I pack up, clear the room and head off home – I arrive just in time for a spinning class at my local gym.

THURSDAY

As I leave home at 5.55 am to catch the bus and tube into London, I contemplate that today is likely to be somewhat of a ‘bitter sweet’ day.

Today’s course is at the Kingsley Thistle hotel in Holborn, which is the first venue that I trained at when I joined Impellus almost three years ago. Since then, I’ve delivered training there almost weekly, so have got to know the Conference and Banqueting team quite well. But, it is the last day we will be using this venue, as we are switching to another larger venue in Holborn from September onwards.

The course is the ILM Level 3 Award ‘Effective Communication Skills’ which gives me especial enjoyment – since I completed my foundation Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) practitioner training, I have been fascinated by the whole psychology behind the art of communication.

The course runs smoothly between 9.30 am to 4.30 pm with 20 multi-cultural delegates from diverse organisations, who participate well throughout the day. Effective Communication Skills is a particularly interactive course as delegates are generally comfortable debating their thoughts on communication – I always enjoy a challenge!

After the course, I say goodbye to the Kingsley Thistle team and make my way home. I have just 25 minutes to jump on my bike and get to my Pilates session which commences at 6.45 pm.

FRIDAY

Working from home, I make notes on our CRM system of delegates from the Wednesday and Thursday courses who would like to attend further courses and/or study the ILM Level 3 Award. This information is taken off the course evaluation and feedback forms that our delegates complete at the end of the day.

I also review these forms to ensure my delivery has met the satisfaction of our clients and to consider calls to clients next week – the number of open course multi-day booking places they have left ‘on account’ may be getting low, they may have several managers registered for the ILM Award but not yet submitted any assignments, or a delegate may have mentioned in the course that their organisation is currently experiencing rapid growth. With my focus on account management, I take a vested interest in finding out more about our client organisations and explore how we can support them further.

On the rare occasion that a course evaluation form may suggest a course has not met the delegate’s expectations, there is also an opportunity to talk to the person who booked the course to establish if their challenges/requirements are different to those of the delegate and what we can do to  overcome the mismatch in expectations.

I speak to my colleagues in the Customer Relationship Team to update them on my client meeting that took place on Tuesday.

Next week we will not be running any courses – there are four weeks in August when we do not deliver open courses due to the peak holiday season – so I will be getting together with the rest of the Training Delivery team to refresh the course content. I take some time to reflect on our courses – what has worked well and if there are any areas for improvement – and jot down some notes to discuss with my colleagues. I also do a little research, as we’re thinking of enhancing our course content around the approaches to learning and development of different generations.

I also reflect on the week, which has flown by. I’ve delivered two courses in the South East to engaged delegates from a real mix of organisations who have provided positive feedback. They will return to work motivated and with practical skills to develop into good leaders. In addition, I had a productive face-to-face meeting with a client — so, all in all, a satisfying and enjoyable week.

Now it’s off for a bike ride through Richmond Park.

How Management Training can help to address Business Challenges

Five Ways that Investing in your Managers can help your Organisation

During day-to-day telephone conversations with clients and prospects, members of the Customer Relationship Team at ILM-Approved Training Centre, Impellus, are often asked: ‘Which business challenges can be addressed by management training?’

The short answer is that it can help to address many challenges faced by organisations today.

In this blog, we have highlighted five key behaviourial changes you are likely to see in your managers as a result of leadership training that will positively impact your organisation:

1.       Increased Confidence and Ownership

A high percentage of managers in organisations across all sectors and industries have been promoted into their role as a result of their qualifications, expertise, experience, hard work and/or length of service. They are now managing people, but have received no formal leadership training and may lack the soft skills and confidence to do this effectively. Very often they are also managing colleagues who were previously their peers.

Following training managers will have increased awareness of their skills and abilities resulting in heightened self-confidence. They have a greater understanding of how their roles affect the overall results of the organisation.

This new-found confidence and self-belief regularly translates into an eagerness to take ownership for their and their team’s responsibilities and a greater desire to motivate and lead their people.

2.       Smarter Time Management and Delegation

Probably the most common complaint heard by the Impellus Training Team when delivering courses is that managers ‘don’t have enough time’/’they are too busy to perform effectively and manage their workloads’.

During leadership training managers will be reminded of the importance of empowering their people through delegation. They will see how to work ‘smarter’ and to create a working environment of effective productivity. Your managers will also return to the workplace believing in the significance of growing and developing their employees via delegation.

3.       Alignment with Company Vision and improved Team Buy-in

With the constant challenge of getting the job done and meeting deadlines, it is all too easy to lose sight of the organisation’s vision, mission and values that everyone should be working towards.

After training, your managers will be bought into the need to create a vision for their team that aligns with that of the organisation and which sets out a path and purpose for them all to consistently improve and evolve.

At the same time, managers will see the value of sharing their passion and belief in this vision to engender buy-in and commitment from their people. By tapping into their team’s enthusiasm, creativity and drive, it will help to remove stagnation and laziness as everyone will be working towards the same goals.

4.       Enhanced Communication Skills

Poor communication in the workplace is rarely A problem, it is usually THE problem. Managers experiencing leadership training often find it quite a revelation to learn how they may be perceived by others.

Becoming acquainted with different communication styles empowers managers to adapt their interactions to different situations and people paving the way to develop and maintain positive working relationships.

On the occasions when conflict occurs in the workplace, they also possess they skills and confidence to overcome it effectively.

5.       The Ability to see the Bigger Picture

Delegates attending Impellus’ open training courses regularly comment on the value of having time away from their busy work environment to have the space to reflect.

They also enjoy the opportunity to meet delegates from different industries and sectors and to discuss, what they come to realise, are common everyday challenges and to explore solutions. The realisation that these issues are not unique to their business often takes the heat out of the difficulties they are immediately facing.

The sharing of challenges also helps your managers to broaden their horizons and see the bigger picture – they become aware of business trends and tactics that they have been missing out on.

 

In addition to these five specific benefits enjoyed by managers who experience leadership training, client organisations, who have invested in their people, report the following long-term organisational advantages:

  • Increased team engagement and motivation
  • A decrease in absenteeism
  • An uplift in employee retention with a resultant reduction in recruitment
  • Improved efficiency and working practices.

For more examples of assessing return on investment in management training, read our blog on this topic.

Pulse (June) – the monthly indicators from Impellus leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – June 2017

As one of the largest ILM-Approved Training Centres in the UK, Impellus delivers open leadership and management courses to over 250 delegates a month. We request feedback from each delegate on the venue, course content and trainer’s delivery to ensure our clients are happy with our service.

Our questionnaire also asks for the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. By reviewing this feedback regularly, we have a good indication of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

Work is better than last year for over two-thirds of managers

The key indicators from delegates attending our open courses in June are as follows:

  • The number of organisations training new and recently appointed managers increased slightly year on year – 67% of all delegates had been in their role three years or less compared with 66% in June 2016
  • Nine per cent of delegates this June had been in their current role for ten years or more, which is on a par with a year ago
  • Ninety-four per cent of all delegates felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously or measurably so’ – which represents an increase from 91% in June 2016.

The trend of managers feeling more positive about their situation at work than a year ago continues. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/ worse than at this time last year. Seventy per cent of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in June 2016 with 5% feeling things are worse.

Read May Pulse to compare the results with those of June.

The Management Confidence Indicator graph for the last 12 months below shows the optimism shared by managers in May has continued into June after the slight dip seen in April.

You can teach an old dog new tricks

As the Government raises the retirement age, one in five workers feels age is hindering their career progression. However, Impellus research reveals older and long-serving managers attending leadership training are more likely to say that the training helps them in their job enormously than other delegates.

There are numerous benefits to giving older and long-standing employees the opportunity to develop their skills, however 20% of UK workers feel that age is the greatest reason they cannot move up the career ladder. The survey by ADP¹ of nearly 10,000 European workers also found that this statistic rises to 46% of over 55-year olds.

From a separate report, published by the CIPD² in April this year, the table below illustrates that participation in education and training for the 55-64 age bracket is far behind that of younger groups. Participation is however much higher in the UK than in the other European countries.

It may be of no great surprise to read these statistics, but nonetheless quite alarming, particularly considering:

  • It can be particularly demotivating if an employee feels that achievement of their career goals is blocked by factors beyond their control
  • Nowadays workforces are made up of five generations and this will become the norm
  • The need for people to work longer, our ageing population and rapid technology changes will necessitate employees updating their skills on an ongoing basis
  • Employers are obliged to treat all employees fairly and have a responsibility to provide opportunities for lifelong learning.

Older managers attendance on training courses

The findings from the ADP and CIPD reports tally with statistics of delegates attending Impellus’ open management courses. In the first five months of 2017, delegates who had been in their current role for ten years or more accounted for on average 11.4% of all delegates. This figure has not increased notably since 2014 when it was an average of 10.5% over the same period.

Interestingly, Impellus can also reveal that even though older/long-serving delegates are in the minority on their courses, they have a higher propensity to say that ‘the training helps them in their job enormously’ than all delegates. Between one third and a half of delegates who had been in their role for 10 years or more felt it helped them enormously compared with between a quarter and a third of delegates overall.

It is disappointing that organisations are not investing in their long-standing staff to the same degree as newly-appointed managers (an earlier blog covers this topic).

Employees themselves, do have a responsibility to pursue openings to develop their skills, but there may be more of a reluctance for older workers to seek out training than their younger, newer counterparts, as:

  • they are less likely to have experienced training in recent years and may therefore be somewhat fearful of the experience
  • they may be unaware of the need to develop their skills if they were promoted a long time ago and have learnt as they have gone along
  • their pride could be preventing them from asking for help/support
  • they are fearful of change.

Benefits of diverse age and experience levels

It seems that many businesses need to address generational concerns of their staff and seek to improve age diversity. There is no doubt that employees of all ages find it motivational to be given the opportunity to develop professionally, not least because it makes them feel valued by their organisation.

Organisations need to develop training programmes that help the older generation to stay up-to-date with skills, as well as initiatives to support all generations. These initiatives may include encouraging younger employees to work with more experienced colleagues to understand aspects of the business and the customer journey that require knowledge from before the digital era.  They may also involve younger, newer colleagues communicating the positive experience and benefits of training.

Reference:

1 ADP is a provider of cloud based Human Capital Management solutions for HR & Payroll. The article appears in June issue of People Management.

2 CIPD Policy Report entitled ‘From ‘inadequate’ to ‘outstanding’: making the UK skills system world class.

Research: The real reasons why managers want to attend leadership development training

Line managers have a key role in providing training opportunities for their people

The results of a survey undertaken in March and April 2017 provide interesting insights into the key reasons for managers attending training, their opinions on its effectiveness and the role that their organisation plays in them attending. Top line findings show:

  • over four-fifths of delegates found the training more useful than they expected
  • the influence of line managers, HR departments and colleagues in managers attending leadership training (55% of all delegates were recommended the training)
  • that almost a quarter of delegates were so keen to be trained that they sought out and found the courses themselves
  • that most delegates attend because they want to understand how they are perceived, to develop the soft skills needed to manage people better and to become inspirational leaders.

Effectiveness of training

Eighty-one per cent of delegates attending open management courses delivered by management training provider, Impellus, rated the training as ‘more useful than expected’. This favourable score points to the power of getting managers away from their daily environment to experience training with other managers from different organisations and sectors and to share everyday challenges. It also backs up the fact that many delegates comment on the value of the real-life commercial examples that are highlighted on the courses for use in the workplace.

Fourteen per cent of attendees felt the course delivered to expectations/weren’t sure what to expect. The remaining 5% found it less useful than expected – indicating a possible lack of communication by those recommending the training regarding the course content.

‘Push of training’ vs ‘Pull of learning’

More than 40% of the delegates attended the training at the suggestion of their line manager / HR department. A further 14% were recommended to attend by a colleague. However, 11% felt they were made to attend by their line manager / HR department, so, in effect, they were pushed into the training.

The ‘pull of learning’ drove almost a quarter of all delegates to find the course and attend as part of their own personal development. This figure echoes statistics in the CIPD Employee Outlook Spring 20172 that shows that almost a quarter of employees disagree or strongly disagree that their organisation provides them with opportunities to learn and grow. The same report also illustrates that 25% of employees feel that their manager is poor or very poor at discussing their training and development needs with them.

Irrespective of the route that the delegate went down to attend the course, the overall impact that it had did not vary greatly:

  • 73% of those who ‘were made to attend’ found the course more useful than expected compared with 81% overall.
    This slight reduction may indicate an initial reluctance to experience training, a hesitation to participate, a fear of what might be involved and, consequently, being less open to the course being able to help them than the other delegates.
  • 81% of those delegates who sought out the course for themselves found it more useful than expected, which is on a par with the overall rating.
    Having researched and found the course, they probably had a good indication of what to expect on the day and were eager to experience the training.

Main objectives of attending training

The key drivers for managers, as they embarked on the course, were predominantly to develop skills and knowledge to enable them to improve their management of people rather than solely to better themselves and gain promotion.

The graph below ranks the reasons for attendance by priority. It shows that delegates are more interested in improving their behaviours as a line manager than just working their way up the career ladder – reinforcing the fact that their organisations have selected the right people to manage teams.

Some of the examples under ‘Other’ included to acquire a better understanding of management styles, take in the opinions/views of others, gain better communication skills and improve self-confidence.

(Delegates were able to select multiple answers to this question.)

¹ Four hundred delegates completed the survey who attended management training courses delivered by Impellus during March and April 2017.

² The CIPD Employee Outlook Spring 2017

Pulse – the monthly indicators from Impellus leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – May 2017

As one of the largest ILM-Approved Training Providers in the UK, Impellus delivers open leadership and management training to more than 250 delegates a month. Ensuring the satisfaction of our clients is a high priority for us, so we request feedback from each delegate on the venue, course content and trainer’s delivery.

Our questionnaire also asks for the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. By analysing this feedback regularly, we have a strong indication of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

Significant rise in new appointed managers undertaking leadership training

The key indicators from delegates attending our open courses in May are as follows:

  • More and more organisations are seizing the opportunity to train new and recently appointed managers. Seventy-three per cent of all managers attending our courses have been in their current role for three years or less – up from 65% in May 2016
  • Five per cent of delegates this May had been in their current role for ten years or more, which has dropped from 10% a year ago
  • Ninety-four per cent of all delegates felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously or measurably so’ – which represents an increase from 91% in May 2016.

The trend of managers feeling more positive about their situation at work than a year ago is continuing. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/ worse than at this time last year. Over 70% of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in May 2016 with 5% feeling things are worse.

 

Read April’s Pulse to compare the results with those of May.

Read the Management Confidence Indicator for the last 12 months.

Pulse (April) – the Impellus monthly indicators from leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – April  2017

As one of the largest ILM-Approved Training Centres in the UK, Impellus delivers open leadership and management courses to more than 250 delegates a month. We request feedback from each delegate on the venue, course content and trainer’s delivery as the satisfaction of our clients features high on our list of priorities.

Our feedback form also covers the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. By analysing this data regularly, we gain a very clear picture of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

Two thirds of managers feel things are better for them than a year ago

The key indicators from delegates attending training in April are as follows:

  • The benefits of training newly appointed managers in leadership training are increasingly being realised by organisations. Sixty-three per cent of all managers attending our courses have been in their current role for three years or less – an increase from 61% in April 2016
  • Twelve per cent of delegates this April had been in their current role for ten years or more, which is on a par with a year ago
  • Eighty-eight per cent of all delegates felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously or measurably so’ – a slight dip from 93% in April 2016.

Managers continue to feel more positive about their situation at work than a year ago. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/worse than at this time last year. Over 65% of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in April 2016 with 7% feeling things are worse.

Read March’s Pulse to compare the results with those of April.

Pulse (March) – the Impellus monthly indicators from leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – March 2017

As a leading ILM-Approved Training Centre, Impellus runs open leadership and management courses for more than 250 delegates each month. We ask each delegate to provide their feedback on the venue, course content and training delivery because we take customer satisfaction very seriously.

Our feedback form also covers the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. By analysing this data regularly, we gain a very clear picture of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

25% more managers attending leadership training

In March 2017 the number of managers attending Impellus’ open leadership and management courses rose by 25% year on year.

  • 64% of all managers attending our courses have been in their current role for three years or less – slightly down on March 2016 when it was 67%
  • Organisations are increasingly realising the benefits of training longer-serving managers. Fifteen per cent of delegates this March have been in their current role for ten years or more compared with 11% in the same month last year
  • 93% of all delegates in March 2017 felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously or measurably so’ compared to 94% in March 2016.

Managers are more positive about their situation at work than a year ago. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/worse than at this time last year. Over 70% of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in March 2016 with only 4% feeling things are worse.

 

Read February’s Pulse to compare the results with those of March.

Pulse (February) – the Impellus monthly indicators from leadership and management training

The temperature in the training room – February 2017

As one of the UK’s largest ILM-Approved Training Centres, Impellus delivers open leadership and management courses to more than 250 delegates each month. We request that each delegate completes a form assessing the venue, course content and training delivery, as we take customer satisfaction very seriously.

The feedback form also calls for the delegate’s opinion on their work situation. Analysis of this data on a regular basis provides us with a clear picture of how senior managers and managers are feeling across the country.

Over two-thirds of managers feel things are better for them at work

The number of managers attending Impellus’ open leadership and management courses rose by 18% year on year.

  • 72% of all managers attending our courses have been in their current role for three years or less – compared to 65% in February 2016
  • There was a slight dip in the number of delegates who have been in their current role for ten years or more (8% compared with 9% in the same month last year)
  • 34% of all delegates in February 2017 felt that ‘training like this improves my performance enormously’ compared to 33% in February 2016

Managers are definitely more upbeat about their situation at work than a year ago. The chart below shows their responses to the statement: In my opinion, things for me at work are generally better/ the same/worse than at this time last year. Over two-thirds of all delegates feel that things are generally better for them than in February 2016 with only 3% feeling things are worse.

Read January’s Pulse to compare the results with those of February.

Read our recent blog on the impact and ROI of training managers early in leadership skills.